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A simple method to directly evaluate the lateral extension of the acromion: an anatomic study of 128 cadaveric scapulae.

TitleA simple method to directly evaluate the lateral extension of the acromion: an anatomic study of 128 cadaveric scapulae.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuthorsTotlis, T., Gowd A. K., Bernardoni E. D., Cole B. J., Verma N. N., & Natsis K.
JournalJ Shoulder Elbow Surg
Volume27
Issue9
Pagination1694-1699
Date Published2018 Sep
ISSN1532-6500
Abstract

BACKGROUND: The lateral extension of the acromion from the glenohumeral joint is the critical variable that both the acromial index and critical shoulder angle reflect. The purpose of this study was to establish a simple and reproducible method to directly measure the lateral extension of the acromion that will be independent of patient demographic characteristics, scapular rotation, or other morphologic features of the shoulder.METHODS: This study used 128 unpaired cadaveric scapulae with a mean age of 69.4 ± 11.1 years (66 right and 62 left scapulae, 65 female and 63 male cadaveric specimens). The lateral extension of the acromion was measured from the supraglenoid tubercle to the most lateral point of the acromion with a digital caliper placed perpendicular to the scapula long axis. This distance was called the "lateral offset of the acromion."RESULTS: The lateral offset was 2.62 ± 0.72 cm in men and 2.69 ± 0.73 cm in women. The offset was 2.61 ± 0.66 cm in right and 2.70 ± 0.78 cm in left scapulae. The offset in the group aged 46-60 years was 2.85 ± 0.76 cm; in the group aged 61-75 years, it was 2.62 ± 0.76 cm; and in the group aged 76 years or older, it was 2.54 ± 0.60 cm. No significant difference was found between any of the groups.CONCLUSIONS: This study established a simple method to directly measure the lateral extension of the acromion based on the longitudinal axis of the scapula, which eliminates bias that may exist in the acromial index and critical shoulder angle from the position of the scapula and glenoid inclination. The lateral offset was found to be independent of sex, side, or age, limiting bias in a potential future clinical application.

DOI10.1016/j.jse.2018.02.072
Alternate JournalJ Shoulder Elbow Surg
PubMed ID29730136

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