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Laparoscopic cholecystectomy in patients with cirrhosis of the liver and symptomatic cholelithiasis.

TitleLaparoscopic cholecystectomy in patients with cirrhosis of the liver and symptomatic cholelithiasis.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2009
AuthorsPavlidis, T. E., Symeonidis N. G., Psarras K., Skouras C., Kontoulis T. M., Ballas K., Rafailidis S. F., Marakis G. N., & Sakantamis A. K.
JournalJSLS
Volume13
Issue3
Pagination342-5
Date Published2009 Jul-Sep
ISSN1086-8089
KeywordsChi-Square Distribution, Cholecystectomy, Laparoscopic, Cholelithiasis, Female, Humans, Liver Cirrhosis, Male, Middle Aged, Postoperative Complications, Retrospective Studies, Treatment Outcome
Abstract

BACKGROUND: The indications and benefits of laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) in patients with liver cirrhosis and symptomatic cholelithiasis have not been satisfactorily documented. The aim of this study was to investigate its efficacy and safety in such patients.METHODS: Medical records of 38 patients with liver cirrhosis (stages Child-Pugh A and B) who underwent LC were retrospectively reviewed. Demographic characteristics and other parameters including initial presentation, conversion rate, complication rate, mortality, and duration of hospital stay were investigated and compared with noncirrhotic patients' parameters in our database.RESULTS: Cirrhotic patients who underwent LC were older than noncirrhotic patients (P=0.021). Both the conversion rate (15.78%) and the duration of hospital stay were increased in the cirrhotic group, but without significant differences. Major complications occurred more often in the cirrhotic group (P=0.027), increasing morbidity; however, the mortality was zero.CONCLUSIONS: LC can be safely performed in Child-Pugh A and B cirrhotic patients with symptomatic gallstone disease, with acceptable complication and conversion rates. The increased risk for a major complication, however, demands more attention than usual.

Alternate JournalJSLS
PubMed ID19793474
PubMed Central IDPMC3015965

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