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The cumulative effect of different childhood trauma types on self-reported symptoms of adult male depression and PTSD, substance abuse and health-related quality of life in a large active-duty military cohort.

TitleThe cumulative effect of different childhood trauma types on self-reported symptoms of adult male depression and PTSD, substance abuse and health-related quality of life in a large active-duty military cohort.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsAgorastos, A., Pittman J. O. E., Angkaw A. C., Nievergelt C. M., Hansen C. J., Aversa L. H., Parisi S. A., Barkauskas D. A., & Baker D. G.
Corporate AuthorsMarine Resiliency Study Team
JournalJ Psychiatr Res
Volume58
Pagination46-54
Date Published2014 Nov
ISSN1879-1379
KeywordsAdolescent, Adult, Cohort Studies, Depression, Humans, Life Change Events, Logistic Models, Male, Mental Health, Military Personnel, Psychiatric Status Rating Scales, Quality of Life, Self Report, Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic, Substance-Related Disorders, Young Adult
Abstract

History of childhood trauma (CT) is highly prevalent and may lead to long-term consequences on physical and mental health. This study investigated the independent association of CT with symptoms of adult depression and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), mental and physical health-related quality of life (HRQoL), as well as current tobacco consumption and alcohol abuse in a large homogenous cohort of 1254 never-deployed, young male Marines enrolled in the Marine Resiliency Study. Independent effects of CT history, number and type of CT on outcomes were analyzed using hierarchical multivariate logistic regression models. Our results suggested dose-dependent negative effect of an increasing number of trauma types of CT on depression, PTSD and HRQoL. Experience of single CT type demonstrated overall weak effects, while history of multiple CT types distinctively increased the likelihood of adult PTSD symptomology (OR: 3.1, 95% CI: 1.5-6.2), poor mental (OR: 2.3, 95% CI: 1.7-3.1) and physical HRQoL (OR: 1.4, 95% CI: 1.1-1.9). Risk for depression symptoms was similar for both single and multiple CT (OR: 2.2, 95% CI: 1.3-3.8 and OR: 2.1, 95% CI: 1.2-3.5 respectively). CT history had no effects on current tobacco use and alcohol abuse. Our study thus provides evidence for substantial additive effect of different CT types on adult mental and physical health with increasing levels of exposure.

DOI10.1016/j.jpsychires.2014.07.014
Alternate JournalJ Psychiatr Res
PubMed ID25139009
Grant ListR01 MH093500 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
1R01MH093500 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States

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