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Primary extracerebral meningeal glioblastoma: clinical and pathological analysis.

TitlePrimary extracerebral meningeal glioblastoma: clinical and pathological analysis.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2010
AuthorsStavrinou, P., Magras I., Stavrinou L. C., Zaraboukas T., Polyzoidis K. S., & Selviaridis P.
JournalCent Eur Neurosurg
Volume71
Issue1
Pagination46-9
Date Published2010 Feb
ISSN1868-4912
KeywordsDura Mater, Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein, Glioblastoma, Humans, Ki-67 Antigen, Male, Meningeal Neoplasms, Middle Aged, Neoplasm Recurrence, Local
Abstract

Primary meningeal gliomas are uncommon tumors in the subarachnoid space, their primary characteristic being the absence of any obvious connection to the brain parenchyma. Rarely, they are quite malignant and assume a bulky, well circumscribed appearance rendering the differential diagnosis from other CNS neoplasms difficult. A 53-year-old man presented with a history of persistent headaches and left sided weakness. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a temporoparietal mass attached to the dura that strongly resembled a meningioma. At surgery, the outer layer of the dura mater was intact and there was a clear brain-tumor interface without obvious pial disruption. Histological examination showed a biphasic pattern consisting of benign connective tissue intermingled with bundles of what seemed to be a glioblastoma. The mass demonstrated strong positivity for GFAP and the MIB labeling index focally exceeded 20%. The tumor was identified as a primary meningeal glioblastoma. The patient was disease-free for 42 months, after which he developed a recurrence for which he was re-operated. This time, the pathological findings of the tumor were those of a typical glioblastoma multiforme. We discuss the origin of the initial neoplasm and also the differential diagnosis that needs to include meningioma, aggressive glioblastoma infiltrating the dura and a recently recognized bimorphic CNS tumor: the desmoplastic glioblastoma.

DOI10.1055/s-0029-1225652
Alternate JournalCent Eur Neurosurg
PubMed ID20175027

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