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The value of vacuum-assisted closure in septic patients treated with laparostomy.

TitleThe value of vacuum-assisted closure in septic patients treated with laparostomy.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2012
AuthorsPliakos, I., Papavramidis T. S., Michalopoulos N., Deligiannidis N., Kesisoglou I., Sapalidis K., & Papavramidis S.
JournalAm Surg
Volume78
Issue9
Pagination957-61
Date Published2012 Sep
ISSN1555-9823
KeywordsAbdomen, Abscess, Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Bandages, Chi-Square Distribution, Fasciitis, Necrotizing, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy, Pancreatic Diseases, Peritonitis, Postoperative Complications, Retrospective Studies, Statistics, Nonparametric, Surgical Wound Infection, Treatment Outcome
Abstract

The ideal method of temporary abdominal closure (TAC) should allow rapid closure, easy maintenance, and wound repair with minimal tissue damage. The aim of this retrospective study is to compare open abdomen outcomes between patients managed with vacuum-assisted closure (VAC), and patients managed with other methods of TAC, when septic abdomen is present. Two groups of patients with septic open abdomen: 27 treated with VAC versus 31 treated with other techniques of TAC. We studied open abdomen duration, number of dressing changes, re-exploration rate, successful abdominal closure rate, overall mortality, and development of enteroatmospheric fistulas. The VAC device demonstrated its superiority concerning open abdomen duration (P < 0.001), number of dressing changes (P < 0.001), re-exploration rate (P < 0.002), successful abdominal closure rate (P < 0.0001), and development of enteroatmospheric fistulas (P < 0.00001). Compared with other methods of TAC, our experience with the VAC device demonstrated its advantages concerning clinical feasibility. The high rates of direct fascia closure with an acceptable rate of ventral hernias are further benefits of this technique.

Alternate JournalAm Surg
PubMed ID22964204

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