The english version of the website of the School of Medicine is under development

Δημοσίευση

Benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes: Relationship between type of seizures and response to medication in a Greek population.

TitleBenign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes: Relationship between type of seizures and response to medication in a Greek population.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsGkampeta, A., Fidani L., Zafeiriou D., & Pavlou E.
JournalJ Neurosci Rural Pract
Volume6
Issue4
Pagination545-8
Date Published2015 Oct-Dec
ISSN0976-3147
Abstract

PURPOSE: Benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS) is considered to be the most common childhood epileptic syndrome. We studied the relationship between the type of seizures and response to medication in a Greek population.MATERIALS AND METHODS: We studied 60 neurodevelopmentally normal children diagnosed with BECTS. Children were subdivided into three groups, based on type of seizures: Group A comprised 32 children with generalized tonic-clonic seizures, Group B 19 children with focal seizures and Group C 9 children with focal seizures with secondary generalization. All patients in the present study were started on an antiepileptic medication after the third seizure (sodium valproate, carbamazepine, and oxcarbazepine), and we studied the response to medication.RESULTS: 10 from 13 (76.92%) of patients in Group A, 13 from 15 (86.66%) patients in Group B, and all 6 patients (100%) in Group C started carbamazepine or oxcarbazepine had a favorable respond. Similarly, 16 from 19 (84.2%) of patients in Group A, 3 from 4 patients (75%) in Group B, and 1 from 3 patients (33.3%) in Group C, started sodium valproate responded well to medication.CONCLUSIONS: The majority of children responded well to the first antiepileptic treatment and had a favorable outcome, regardless of type of seizures. 88.3% of children became seizure free by 1 or 2 years after seizure onset. These findings are indicative that the type of seizures has no major effect neither in response to antiepileptic treatment or in the final outcome. Further research in a larger number of children is needed.

DOI10.4103/0976-3147.165420
Alternate JournalJ Neurosci Rural Pract
PubMed ID26752901
PubMed Central IDPMC4692014

Contact

Secretariat of the School of Medicine
 

Connect

Schoole of Medicince presence in social networks
Follow Us or Connect with us.